Nerdiness has a price, are you willing to pay?

Amy. 23. British. Animation Student.

jaramo:

heyo!
don’t worry, your english turned out fine, dude.

as a foreword of warning,
it is best that you don’t use this post as a standalone tutorial, 
instead, try to use it as a study aid to help you make sense of real-life references.
(same applies for any decent “art tutorial” out there, really. :p)

bolded numbers correspond to the numbers on this post’s pictures.

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1 day ago on July 22nd | J | 15,307 notes

aimlessme:

Wisconsin women’s hockey all-time leading scorer Hilary Knight poses nude for ESPN Body Issue

Knight: “There is this image of athletic women as small and petite — the yoga body type. Women in general, we tend to shrink ourselves and not have as much confidence as we should in presenting ourselves and our body types. It’s OK to be fit and healthy and comfortable within your body, whatever frame you have. Since gaining 15 pounds to be at the top of my sport [for the Olympics], I’ve tried to shatter the body image that muscular isn’t feminine.”

1 day ago on July 22nd | J | 6,944 notes
charliebowater:

Hi everyone! You might remember last year I released my Skillshare Character Concept Art class and that went down a storm, over 2000 of you signed up for it and it received 100% positive reviews. The support was overwhelming so thank you to everyone that took the class!
It was my intention to release the follow up on Skillshare.com again, but the site has changed considerably in the time since my first class, and it’s not the most straight forward option this time. 

The new tutorial, which is indeed a direct continuation of my first class, is now available through gumroad instead!

It’s 36 minutes long and gives you a pretty good general overview of my average colour process. I’ve tried my best to explain things as thoroughly as possible for any beginners watching, info on layer ordering, colour choices, layer modes etc. I’m sure most of you will understand what I’m doing and why I’m doing it, but I haven’t assumed that everyone will know by default. So explanations a-plenty! 

The full size PSD is included, with the B&W character from the previous class and the new colour version so you can toggle between the two. My brush pack is also included, which is available all the time regardless (you aren’t paying for it!) but I’ve included it in the pack as well for convenience.

The tutorial is $9 and available to download right now! The only real difference between my previous Skillshare class and this new tutorial - is just that there isn’t a written guide to accompany it, and that’s reflected in the price. 

I’m totally open to releasing more tutorials and there will be freebies along the way, so if you have any specific requests then fire away! I should probably say that the next tutorial I have in mind will be all about painting skin! I’ve talked about it as much I can in this video, but a more in-depth tutorial is certainly on the cards. 

charliebowater:

Hi everyone! You might remember last year I released my Skillshare Character Concept Art class and that went down a storm, over 2000 of you signed up for it and it received 100% positive reviews. The support was overwhelming so thank you to everyone that took the class!

It was my intention to release the follow up on Skillshare.com again, but the site has changed considerably in the time since my first class, and it’s not the most straight forward option this time. 
The new tutorial, which is indeed a direct continuation of my first class, is now available through gumroad instead!
It’s 36 minutes long and gives you a pretty good general overview of my average colour process. I’ve tried my best to explain things as thoroughly as possible for any beginners watching, info on layer ordering, colour choices, layer modes etc. I’m sure most of you will understand what I’m doing and why I’m doing it, but I haven’t assumed that everyone will know by default. So explanations a-plenty! 
The full size PSD is included, with the B&W character from the previous class and the new colour version so you can toggle between the two. My brush pack is also included, which is available all the time regardless (you aren’t paying for it!) but I’ve included it in the pack as well for convenience.
The tutorial is $9 and available to download right now! The only real difference between my previous Skillshare class and this new tutorial - is just that there isn’t a written guide to accompany it, and that’s reflected in the price. 
I’m totally open to releasing more tutorials and there will be freebies along the way, so if you have any specific requests then fire away! I should probably say that the next tutorial I have in mind will be all about painting skin! I’ve talked about it as much I can in this video, but a more in-depth tutorial is certainly on the cards. 
2 days ago on July 21st | J | 473 notes

beastofthewest:

Some hand references.

Sources 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Redid a post by fucktonofanatomyreferencesreborn with sources because they never source anything and I don’t want to reblog that post because I don’t want to support blogs who don’t give credit to people

(No, stating that the art is ~not yours~ and ~came from elsewhere~ IS NOT PROPER CREDIT. Many of these have usernames and such on them but not every single one and you still ought to link back to the specific piece)

I couldn’t source the last one so I didn’t include it.

5 days ago on July 18th | J | 54,870 notes

sharpie91:

A bunch of expression doodles.  Sorry if some of them are kind of repetitive.  

6 days ago on July 17th | J | 3,213 notes

Starry Night Brush for Sai Paint

grumpybuneary:

discordtrolls:

image

image

dude

1 week ago on July 14th | J | 26,955 notes

goddessofsax:

Here’s a handy dandy color reference chart for you artists, writers, or any one else who needs it! Inspired by this post x

1 week ago on July 11th | J | 232,895 notes

ikimaru:

..not what I meant to do this evening but look I made a tutorial!

this kinda got out of hand but I was having fun shh

remember to experiment around, there are many different ways to do things! B) it’s up to you finding the one you like!

also gomen for crappy handwriting and some rushed drawings

2 weeks ago on July 9th | J | 46,572 notes
Would you mind showing how you draw your face profiles/side views? You're really good at it and like the noses are really cute and your jawbones don't look all awkward either;;

Anonymous

ruf1ohn1tram:

i made another giff because i cant explain shit u-u

2 weeks ago on July 9th | J | 2,168 notes
Tagged as: #reference 
wishroom:

Bartek Gawel, CDPR’s art director, shares some insight on the importance of head construction for successful character design.

The secret to a good character concept  is its head. Not to brag about the eyes as the mirrors of the soul or the number of emotions a human face can express let’s just get on with it. Because it’s all in the head – believe me.
Any to-be concept artist will have to learn sooner or later how to draw a good face. I decided to take my time and start this little tutorial and share the knowledge, that was gathered by artists and human body experts (scientists to be precise) throughout the ages.
In this episode I’ll write a little bit about the first principal which defines the look and character of the head you are designing. Today I will write about the facial angle.
The most important element you will need while constructing the head is the middle of the ear. This is represented by the red dot on the illustration above.
A line crossing this point and perpendicular to the horizon helps us find the beginning of the neck i.e. the place where the neck meets the chest (point A). Traditional sculptors use a special pendulum  to find the correct line. It’s good if you have an apprentice of any kind to hold it for you, while you’re busy with your work.
The models character is determined by the so called facial angle. This concept was used for the first time in the 18th Century by Petrus Camper, a Dutch anthropologist, scientist and sculptor. He introduced  a constant head position based upon a line drawn from the middle of the ear (red dot)  to the septum (the red line). The second line needed to create the face angle is drawn from the forehead surface with the jaw (yellow line). This angle can have different rays and be even right.
Determining the facial angle allows you to have a base for further head construction and influences the look of the model on an early stage, before you start outlining other elements (e.g. a nose).

[blog post]

wishroom:

Bartek Gawel, CDPR’s art director, shares some insight on the importance of head construction for successful character design.

The secret to a good character concept  is its head. Not to brag about the eyes as the mirrors of the soul or the number of emotions a human face can express let’s just get on with it. Because it’s all in the head – believe me.

Any to-be concept artist will have to learn sooner or later how to draw a good face. I decided to take my time and start this little tutorial and share the knowledge, that was gathered by artists and human body experts (scientists to be precise) throughout the ages.

In this episode I’ll write a little bit about the first principal which defines the look and character of the head you are designing. Today I will write about the facial angle.

The most important element you will need while constructing the head is the middle of the ear. This is represented by the red dot on the illustration above.

A line crossing this point and perpendicular to the horizon helps us find the beginning of the neck i.e. the place where the neck meets the chest (point A). Traditional sculptors use a special pendulum  to find the correct line. It’s good if you have an apprentice of any kind to hold it for you, while you’re busy with your work.

The models character is determined by the so called facial angle. This concept was used for the first time in the 18th Century by Petrus Camper, a Dutch anthropologist, scientist and sculptor. He introduced  a constant head position based upon a line drawn from the middle of the ear (red dot)  to the septum (the red line). The second line needed to create the face angle is drawn from the forehead surface with the jaw (yellow line). This angle can have different rays and be even right.

Determining the facial angle allows you to have a base for further head construction and influences the look of the model on an early stage, before you start outlining other elements (e.g. a nose).

[blog post]

2 weeks ago on July 5th | J | 12,344 notes